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      Q: What are some of the signs?

      A: An amniocentesis can be associated with some possible complications and if you feel anything unusual after an amniocentesis you should let your doctor know right away. Some of the warning signs are:

      • Abdominal or vaginal pain
      • Vaginal bleeding
      • Increased vaginal discharge or fluid from the vagina
      • High temperatures (fever)
      • Cessation of fetal movements

         


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    • 07/16/01--20:39: Missed Abortion
      • In a missed abortion, the woman usually is not aware of the loss, specifically when there is no vaginal bleeding or abdominal pain. A missed abortion can happen in the first or second trimester, though it usually happens in the first trimester. A missed abortion is usually diagnosed when the blood hCG fails to increase as expected, or when on ultrasound there is either no embryo (blighted ovum), or when there is an embryo or fetus but no heartbeat.

        Most miscarriages which eventually have symptoms such as bleeding or passage of tissue, usually begin with a missed abortion. The embryo or fetus has died several weeks before there are symptoms and the bleeding begins. The difference between a miscarriage that begins with bleeding and a missed abortion is that the missed abortion was diagnosed by ultrasound or a blood test and before there is bleeding or other symptoms.

        Treatment of a missed abortion

         

         


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          Constipation is a common problem during pregnancy. One of the reasons is the hormone progesterone, which slows the movement of food through your digestive tract. And the problem may be compounded later in pregnancy by the pressure of your growing uterus on your rectum. Iron supplements can make constipation worse.

          constipation-during-pregnancy.jpg

          Constipation is usually not serious, though occasionally it can be a symptom of another problem. If you have severe constipation that's accompanied by abdominal pain, alternates with diarrhea, or you pass mucus or blood, call your doctor immediately. Straining during a bowel movement or passing a hard stool can lead to or worsen hemorrhoids, swollen veins in the rectal area. Hemorrhoids can be extremely uncomfortable, though they rarely cause serious problems and in most cases they go away fairly soon after your baby is born.

          Non-medical treatments

          • Exercise regularly. Walking, swimming, riding on a stationary bike, and yoga can all help ease constipation and leave you feeling more fit and healthy.
          • Drink plenty of liquids
          • Eat high-fiber foods such as cereals, whole-grain breads, and fresh fruits and vegetables every day. Add a couple of tablespoons of unprocessed wheat bran (available at health food stores) to your cereal in the morning and follow it with a glass of water. Use fiber supplements like Metamucil® or Citrucel®. Even with a healthy, balanced diet, the fiber content may not be adequate. Although you may think of Metamucil and Citrucel as laxatives, they are simply a concentrated source of fiber, and therefore safely serve a useful purpose. The powder forms work better than tablets for most people. Be sure to drink a lot of liquids! Fiber supplements are safe even if taken on a daily basis.
          • Pick a time of day to routinely try to move your bowels. Many people find that trying to have a BM after breakfast or after a cup of coffee is better than waiting until they feel the urge. Rushing around all day ignoring the mild signals you get from your body is not conducive to normal bowel function!

          Medications:
          Stool softeners (like Colace®) and mild laxatives like Milk of Magnesia (we call it M.O.M. in the hospital!) are safe to use during pregnancy. M.O.M. can also be used for heartburn. It is always best to avoid stimulant laxatives (like Dulcolax®, Ex-lax® and Correctol®) unless directed by your practitioner. If you are not sure about a laxative's safety, be sure to ask your practitioner.

           

           


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            Abdominal achiness or pain is among the most common pregnancy symptoms. It is not uncommon to feel sharp pains on the sides of the abdomen with the growth of the fetus.

            Causes of Abdominal Achiness and Pains

            One cause for abdominal achiness and pains is due to the stretching of your round ligaments, which are located on both sides of the abdomen and run from the top of the abdromen to the groin area, which occurs during pregnancy. As the embryo grows within the uterus, the stomach get larger and larger and the thick bands of connective tissue stretch in order to accommodate the new size. It is this stretching of the ligaments that often causes some aches and pains.

            Another cause for abdominal achiness and pains may be due to the increased blood flow that is now necessary in order to support your growing baby.

            Yet another cause may be due to the fact that throughout your pregnancy there is a build-up of your endometrium in your uterus. While your endometrium shed during menstration, now that you are prengnat and no longer menstrating you are no longer shedding your endometrium.

            Important Facts about Abdominal Achiness and Pains

            Sudden changes in body position are enough to trigger round ligament/abdominal pain. Getting up quickly, lying down, or even a sharp cough can cause new stretching of the ligaments that can be painful. These pains often last only a few brief moments, but it is not uncommon for the soreness to linger for a few hours. If the pains are associated with spotting, cramping, change in body temperature or fever, it is important to seek out medical attention.

            Treatment for Round Ligament Pain

            Abdominal achiness is something that comes with pregnancy, but that does not mean you have to sit around in pain for its duration. Sitting down with your feet propped up is one of the best solutions of round ligament/abdominal achiness and pain. If resting does not relieve the pain or the achiness turnes into sharper pain, contact your attending physician for more advice.


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          • 04/06/10--18:20: Abdominal Achiness
            • During pregnancy, the ligaments located on the left and right side of the abdomen may feel achy from time to time. It is not uncommon to feel sharp pains on the sides of the tummy as well with the growth of the fetus.

              Causes of Round Ligament Pain
              Ligaments are located on the sides of the abdomen. These run from the top of the tummy to the groin area. As baby grows, the tummy gets larger and larger and the thick bands of connective tissue must stretch in order to accommodate the new size. As the ligaments stretch, some aches and pains are often felt by pregnant women. Increased blood flow to the area may also cause some pain which is also common.

              Important Facts about Abdominal Achiness
              Sudden changes in body position are enough to trigger round ligament pain. Getting up quickly, lying down or even a sharp cough can cause new stretching of the ligaments that can be painful. These pains often last only a few brief moments, but it is not uncommon for the soreness to linger for a few hours. If the pains are associated with spotting, cramping, change in body temperature or fever, it is important to seek out medical attention regarding the pain.

              Treatment for Round Ligament Pain
              Abdominal achiness is something that comes along with pregnancy, but that does not mean mom has to sit around in pain for the duration. Sitting down with feet propped up is one of the best solutions. If resting does not relieve the pain or the achiness turns into a sharper pain, contact your attending physician for more advice.


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                Pregnancy is a beautiful, life-altering experience, but it can also be painful. The female body is used to the normal monthly cycle and average hormone levels most of the time. When pregnancy occurs, hormones like estrogen and progesterone flood the body, weight gain occurs and the abdomen stretches larger than most women can even comprehend. The pain associated with these changes can often be scary and confusing.

                Lower Body Pains During Pregnancy

                • Lower Back Pain: The abdomen is growing out and down and back muscles are not equipped for the added weight. This additional pressure can lead to back aches and pains during pregnancy. Progesterone may also be partly to blame. Progesterone works to loosen ligaments for birth, but it cannot dedicate that work to the pelvic region only. Loose back ligaments can lead to hyper-extension of the back and back pains during pregnancy.
                • Hip and Pelvis Pain: Progesterone is to blame for these pains as well. The same ligament loosening process that allows baby to move through the birth canal will loosen connective tissues in the pelvis and hips causing pains during pregnancy.

                Upper Body Pains During Pregnancy

                • Abdominal Pain: As the fetus grows the uterus will expand and so will abdominal muscles and skin. Stretching skin and lengthening (and thickening) ligaments can easily cause pains during pregnancy.
                • Sciatic Pain: The sciatic nerve is the longest in the human body running from the neck area down through the midsection and down the leg. Pains during pregnancy associated with the sciatic nerve are often associated with increased pressure on the portion of the nerve located in the buttocks. Sitting for long periods of time may increase the risk of sciatic pains during pregnancy.
                • Shoulder and Neck Pain: Back to progesterone, the ligaments in the shoulders and neck are loosened during pregnancy. Combine this looseness with the weight of the abdomen and already taxed back muscles and posture may be affected. Something as simple as a small change in posture can cause shoulder and neck pains during pregnancy.

                Limb and Head Pains During Pregnancy

                • Wrist and Arm Pain: Often referred to as carpal tunnel syndrome, swelling of the hands and wrists may cause pains during pregnancy. The carpal tunnel is a small hole in the wrist through which nerves pass. When pregnancy swelling occurs, these nerves can be pinched causing fingers to tingle, go numb or hurt. Wrist braces can be used to prevent swelling induced wrist and arm pains during pregnancy.
                • Headaches and Migraines: Good old hormones are often responsible for headaches and migraines. Some women who suffer from migraines before pregnancy find symptoms are worse while pregnant while others seem to find relief from migraine pains during pregnancy. Each female body will react differently to hormone changes.

                Here's a list of Safe Medications to Take During Pregnancy.


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                  Crohn’s Disease is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder. Typically, the body can tell the difference between native and foreign substances, but patients with Crohn’s Disease lack this ability. Their bodies are constantly on high immune alert causing constant inflammation, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract. Patients are often diagnosed with one of four types of Crohn’s Disease depending on the portion of the gastrointestinal tract affected. The disease can affect the rectum, small intestine, large intestine or colon.

                  ColonWho is at Risk?
                  Anyone with a family history of Crohn’s Disease or of Jewish decent are at increased risk for the condition. Smoking also increases the risk of contracting Crohn’s Disease.

                  Symptoms

                  Crohn’s Disease symptoms tend to present when the condition flares. The specific symptoms depend upon the area of the gastrointestinal tract most affected by the disease. Common symptoms include:

                  • Abdominal cramping
                  • Loss of energy
                  • No appetite
                  • Painful bowel movements
                  • Diarrhea
                  • Weight loss

                  Other symptoms that appear less often include constipation, pain in joints, inflammation of the liver, bloody stool and sores on the skin.

                  Complications

                  Due to a thickening of the intestinal tract, patients may experience intestinal blockage or bowel obstructions. Growth may be slower than average and nutritional deficiency may occur. Children may show signs of sexual developmental delays.

                  Diagnosis

                  Patients presenting with symptoms of Crohn’s Disease will often undergo a detailed medical history and physical tests, before being scheduled for other diagnostic procedures. Palpation of the abdomen often reveals masses in the stomach that may hurt to touch. Joints may appear swollen and a skin rash may be present in some cases.
                  After physical testing is complete, doctors may suggest colonoscopy, upper GI, enteroscopy, endoscopy and CT scan to make a final diagnosis. A stool culture may be collected for testing.

                  Crohn's Disease During Pregnancy

                  The prognosis of Crohn's disease during pregnancy depends on the severity and exptent of the disease when she becomes pregnant and the medications she takes. If she is in remission at that time than two-thirds of women will stay in remission. Women who have active Crohn's at the time of onset of pregnancy are more likely to remain active during pregnancy. There is no complete agreement of the effects of pregnancy on Crohn's disease or the effect of Crohn's on pregnancy. The more severe the extent of the disease at the beginning of pregnancy, the more severe it will be during pregnancy, and there will be an increasec risk of premature birth and low birthweight babies.  

                  Treatment
                  There is no definitive cause or cure for Crohn’s Disease. Patients must alter diet to reduce symptoms. Specific foods are not prohibited, but each patient will likely discover trigger foods that cause symptoms to flare up. Patients should eat a well-balanced diet broken into small meals eaten five to six times a day. Water intake should also be broken into small amounts. High-fiber, high-fat and fried foods should be avoided. Foods that commonly cause gas like beans and cabbage should also be avoided.

                  Medical treatment for the disease may include medications to reduce stress, fiber supplements and over the counter pain medications. Corticosteroids and anti-immune drugs may be prescribed in moderate to severe cases.

                  If the condition does not improve with other forms of treatment, patients may have bowel resection to remove the diseased portion of the gastrointestinal system. Bowel resection may relieve symptoms temporarily, but it does not cure Crohn’s Disease.

                  Life Expectancy
                  While the symptoms of Crohn’s Disease may be controlled with medications and altered diet and nutrition, patients are at increased risk for colon and bowel cancer. With effective treatment, patients can live a normal life-span, but complications may increase the risk of early death.


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                • 10/26/11--17:38: Strep Throat
                  • Strep throat is one of the most common childhood illnesses. Small white patches appear on one or both sides of the throat and a fever abruptly starts. Strep throat can lead to scarlet fever in rare cases. Most children have a strong enough immune system to fight off the infection without antibiotics, but antibiotics reduce the number of days a child is contagious.

                    Causes
                    Strep throat is caused by group A streptococcus bacteria. The bacteria are present in the throat at all times. It takes an injury or abrasion to the throat to trigger strep throat. Many Strep Throatdoctors will ask parents to think back a week or so for any out of the ordinary coughing or sneezing that was harder than normal. Coughing or sneezing hard can cause small openings for strep bacteria. Strep throat is also caused by infection from another child. Strep throat is passed through sneezes and coughs.

                    Symptoms
                    The most common symptoms of strep throat include abdominal pain, fever, sore throat and difficulty swallowing. A child can come down with strep throat without having any symptoms for the first few days, but once symptoms arise, they can accelerate quickly. Parents may notice small, white spots in the throat. If you don't see any spots, do not rule out strep throat. Spots of infection can appear further down the throat, beyond where the naked eye can view.

                    Diagnosis

                    Most doctors will take a brief history and list of complaints before taking a look in the throat. If there are white patches in the throat, the doctor will likely order a rapid strep test. This test requires the nurse to rub a long cotton swab on the white patch. The swab is then tested for strep bacteria. If white patches are not visible, the doctor may still order a strep test. If the strep test is negative, but the doctor has a gut feeling it is strep throat, antibiotics may be ordered.

                    Treatment
                    Most cases of strep throat will go away within 7 to 10 days without medical intervention, but many parents choose to visit the family pediatrician for an antibiotic. Antibiotics fight the strep infection and relieve symptoms within 2 to 3 days. It is important to continue taking the antibiotic as instructed until the prescription is completely gone. Strep throat may recur if children stop taking antibiotics when symptoms disappear. It takes about 24 hours of antibiotics before children are no longer contagious.

                    READ ABOUT OTHER CHILDHOOD INFECTIONS

                    READ ABOUT INFECTIONS DURING PREGNANCY


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                      There are times during pregnancy when you are just plain uncomfortable. Working until the latter stages of pregnancy could increase this feeling exponentially, but there are a few things you can change about your workspace to increase your comfort level.
                      Place a small fan on your desk. The body's temperature naturally raises when you're pregnant. Instead of sitting in a pool of sweat all day, place a small fan on your desk. It's best to choose a fan that uses electricity as you could need it for several months and batteries get expensive. If you choose a battery-operated fan, use rechargeable batteries and place batteries in the charging device before leaving work each day.

                      Wear comfortable clothes. Restrictive clothing is not only uncomfortable, it can increase risk of pregnancy complications. Wear loose fitting clothing in layers. When you feel warm, take off a few layers. If you get a chill, add a few layers. Always wear materials that allow the skin to breathe, like cotton.

                      Leave the high-heels behind. Your feet are swollen and your balance is off thanks to increased progesterone. Leave high-heels behind for the duration of pregnancy. You'll feel much better with a low-heeled shoe. Work during pregnancy

                      Drink plenty of water. Dehydration is one of the main causes of early labor pains. Drink plenty of water throughout the day to stay hydrated. Drinking more will mean spending more time in the bathroom, but you should be walking around often so bathroom breaks every hour are healthy for baby. 


                      Eat healthy, nutritious meals. Choose whole foods that are nutrient dense. This doesn't mean picking up Chinese food for lunch or eating donuts from the break room. Lean proteins, complex carbohydrates and full-fat yogurts are ideal for lunch.

                      Stay away from stress. Stress not only makes you feel horrible, it can be detrimental to your pregnancy. Remove yourself from stressful situations whenever possible and use deep breathing exercises to reduce stress and control heart rate. 

                      Take frequent breaks. Sitting for long periods of time can increase the risk of blood clots during pregnancy. Get up and walk around for a few minutes every hour. If you're drinking lots of water, you should have no trouble getting in those frequent breaks because you'll be walking to and from the bathroom often.

                      Being comfortable at work during pregnancy is important. Some women must work until the last few weeks before birth and the final trimester tends to be the most uncomfortable.


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                      Having endometriosis was one of the most painful things I’ve ever lived through. Every month the cramping felt like knives were scraping the inside of my uterus and due to irregular bleeding I was afraid to have intercourse or do anything that could bring my period early. Eventually, the pain I lived with for so many years resulted in a total hysterectomy, but before that I was able to conceive children with relatively no problem. That is not the case for some women with endometriosis. The disease can cause immense pain both physically and emotionally. 

                      Pregnant Woman

                      The Physical Pain of Endometriosis
                      It is the physical pain of endometriosis that really hurt me. I suffered from what the doctor’s called external endometriosis. That means endometrial tissue was present in my bloodstream and wherever it decided to make a home was where a cyst would grow. I had two cysts removed in my lifetime. The first was the size of a golf ball and the second was causing internal bleeding. External endometriosis is not as commonly the manifestation for the disease. More common symptoms include adhesions and pain. 

                      The Emotional Pain of Endometriosis
                      Endometriosis causes more than physical pain – that was something I wasn’t prepare to deal with. After the birth of my twins the pain of my previous endometriosis started within a few months. Endometriosis is cured by pregnancy, so I managed a few months free from endo pain – if you call being pregnant with twins being free from pain. Once the pain started, the emotional impact was debilitating. I never wanted to have intercourse. I was constantly scared I would end up back in surgery again and I couldn’t have more children due to complications during the twin’s birth – I was left with no choice but to live the rest of my life in pain. 

                      The connection between endometriosis and infertility is simple – pain means no interest in intercourse and no intercourse means no conception. Moreover, the physical changes caused by the disease can make it hard to conceive anyway. If you think you have endometriosis contact your gynecologist soon. There is help for the physical pain, emotional pain and infertility problems.


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                      Many serious complications in pregnancy are extremely rare, but it’s important that you learn the signs and symptoms of them so that you know when to immediately contact your doctor. Certain symptoms always require immediate attention no matter what they indicate. Vaginal bleeding is one such symptom. It can be a sign of a wide variety of complications, but all of them are serious and potentially fatal. You shouldn’t have any bleeding or spotting during your third trimester, so notify your doctor immediately if you see that you do. One serious complication is placental abruption.

                      Placental abruption occurs when the placenta separates from the uterine wall before the time of delivery. It only occurs in 1% of all pregnancies, and it usually occurs sometime after the 20th week. While dangerous for the fetus, doctors can easily treat the condition. If the abruption is partial, your doctor will probably monitor your pregnancy closely until delivery, and you’ll probably need to rest until your baby is ready to be delivered. If the placenta has completely separated, your doctor will likely recommend delivery, because your baby will no longer have a supply of nutrients or oxygen in the womb otherwise.

                      The symptoms of placental abruption are ones you should be looking out for anyway in your third trimester. Vaginal bleeding, intense and fast contractions, and abdominal pain or tenderness are all common symptoms. To determine whether or not you’ve suffered from a placental abruption, your doctor will give you an ultrasound, close monitoring, and a set of blood tests.

                      There is no known cause for placental abruption, but certain activities during pregnancy have been associated with its onset. Women who smoke are more prone to the condition, and women who are pregnant and over the age of 35 are more likely to have it as well. Trauma to the abdomen during pregnancy is another common cause, and women who have had previous abruptions in past births will also be more likely to have one in their current pregnancy.

                      There is no denying that rapid contractions and abdominal pain in the third trimester are a seriously bad sign, so you should always call your doctor immediately if you experience any such abnormalities. You won’t know whether or not it’s a placental abruption until you’ve had an ultrasound and multiple levels of testing, but the condition is likely serious no matter what the complication is.

                      Source: Musarrat Jabeen et al: Abruptio Placentae: Risk Factors and Perinatal Outcome. Journal of Postgraduate Medical Institute Volume 18 Issue 4 20011


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                      Just because labor is over and you’re holding the cutest baby on earth doesn’t mean the pain of pregnancy is over. Pregnancy and labor pains are taken over by postpartum pains almost immediately after giving birth. Some pains last for several weeks or months after birth, but there is something you can do to ease nearly every postpartum pain. 

                      PainMuscle Soreness
                      There is no doubt you will feel soreness in muscles you didn’t even know you had after giving birth. The process of pushing baby through the birth canal is strenuous, which is one of the main reasons doctor’s suggest keeping up with an exercise program during pregnancy. Remember to use heating pads and an over the counter pain medication approved by your doctor. If you are breastfeeding, double check all medications with your doctor before taking. There are some medications you may need to forego until you’ve weaned baby. 

                      Breast Pain
                      Whether you choose to breastfeed or bottle feed, you will start producing milk immediately after birth. Your breasts will grow rapidly in anticipation of breastfeeding. If you start breastfeeding the pain will subside with time as a normal supply of milk comes in and baby regularly empties your breasts. If you choose to bottle feed, breast pain will subside after you stop producing milk. Wear a restrictive bra and minimize nipple stimulation to reduce pain naturally. 

                      Birthing Pain
                      Vaginal births can cause pain around the vaginal opening and perineum. Sitz baths are effective at reducing local pain, but many women do not have sitz bath equipment at home. Ask your physician for the address of a local medical store where you can purchase sitz bath equipment. If you were given a sitz bath in the hospital, ask if you can take the equipment home to ease pain. 

                      C-Section Pain
                      C-section pain is similar to pain associated with general surgery. Your incision will be in the stomach area – below the belly button. Incision size will vary, but most doctors make the smallest incision possible, but that doesn’t mean you won’t feel pain. A prescription pain medication is available in the hospital and, sometimes, at home. If you are experiencing extreme pain talk to your doctor as it could be a sign of infection or other surgical complication. 

                      Before you know it the pain you experienced during pregnancy, labor and postpartum will disappear and you’ll be left with wonderful memories of rolling, kicking, pushing and holding baby for the first time.  


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                        progesterone serum in pregnancyA study published in Springerplus from researchers at Ahmadi Hospital and Ain Shams University reveals a simple blood test that may help predict the viability of pregnancy with early vaginal bleeding. Data was collected from 260 women – 178 viable pregnancies and 82 non-viable pregnancies. All patients were admitted to the hospital for abdominal pain or vaginal bleeding at around 10 weeks gestation.

                        Doctors took a two ml blood samples from all patients and ran a progesterone assay. About 94% of viable pregnancies measured in excess of 10 ng/ml of progesterone. About 80% of women who later lost the pregnancy measured less than 10 ng/ml of progesterone. 

                        Conclusion: When patients in early weeks of pregnancy complain of abdominal pain or vaginal bleeding, a progesterone assay may be able to predict the viability of the pregnancy. Researchers involved with the study did not suggest how attending physicians or obstetricians should use the information. No information was provided regarding how long after the progesterone assay the pregnancy spontaneously terminated. 

                        Source: Abdelazim IA, Elezz AA, Elsherbiny M. Relation between single serum progesterone assay and viability of the first trimester pregnancy. Springerplus. 2012 Dec;1(1):80. Epub 2012 Dec 27.


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                          pregnancy testPain and bleeding in early pregnancy can cause mental stress, but are pregnant women receiving proper follow-up care after diagnostic intervention for these symptoms during pregnancy? According to researchers from Oxford University, less than 10% of women receiving an ultrasound for pain or bleeding prior to the 16th week of pregnancy were scheduled for a follow-up appointment with their general practitioner.

                          A total of 57 women were recruited for the study. None of the women had been seen at the emergency clinic where the ultrasound was ordered for pain or bleeding in early pregnancy. Of the patients seen, less than 10% were given immediate follow-up appointments yet 33% reported feelings of distress, including anxiety among viable and non-viable pregnancies.

                          General practitioners are advised to offer follow-up appointments to address mental and physical health status in women with pain and bleeding in early pregnancy. Appointments could be beneficial for women with both viable and non-viable pregnancies.

                          Source: Moscrop A, Harrison S, Heppell V, Heneghan C, Ward A. Primary care follow-up and measured mental health outcomes among women referred for ultrasound assessment of pain and/or bleeding in early pregnancy: a quantitative questionnaire study. BMJ Open. 2013 Apr 11;3(4). pii: e002595. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-002595. Print 2013.


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                          Q: What are some of the signs?

                          A: An amniocentesis can be associated with some possible complications and if you feel anything unusual after an amniocentesis you should let your doctor know right away. Some of the warning signs are:

                          • Abdominal or vaginal pain
                          • Vaginal bleeding
                          • Increased vaginal discharge or fluid from the vagina
                          • High temperatures (fever)
                          • Cessation of fetal movements

                             


                          0 0

                          Constipation is a common problem during pregnancy. One of the reasons is the hormone progesterone, which slows the movement of food through your digestive tract. And the problem may be compounded later in pregnancy by the pressure of your growing uterus on your rectum. Iron supplements can make constipation worse.

                          constipation-during-pregnancy.jpg

                          Constipation is usually not serious, though occasionally it can be a symptom of another problem. If you have severe constipation that's accompanied by abdominal pain, alternates with diarrhea, or you pass mucus or blood, call your doctor immediately. Straining during a bowel movement or passing a hard stool can lead to or worsen hemorrhoids, swollen veins in the rectal area. Hemorrhoids can be extremely uncomfortable, though they rarely cause serious problems and in most cases they go away fairly soon after your baby is born.

                          Non-medical treatments

                          • Exercise regularly. Walking, swimming, riding on a stationary bike, and yoga can all help ease constipation and leave you feeling more fit and healthy.
                          • Drink plenty of liquids
                          • Eat high-fiber foods such as cereals, whole-grain breads, and fresh fruits and vegetables every day. Add a couple of tablespoons of unprocessed wheat bran (available at health food stores) to your cereal in the morning and follow it with a glass of water. Use fiber supplements like Metamucil® or Citrucel®. Even with a healthy, balanced diet, the fiber content may not be adequate. Although you may think of Metamucil and Citrucel as laxatives, they are simply a concentrated source of fiber, and therefore safely serve a useful purpose. The powder forms work better than tablets for most people. Be sure to drink a lot of liquids! Fiber supplements are safe even if taken on a daily basis.
                          • Pick a time of day to routinely try to move your bowels. Many people find that trying to have a BM after breakfast or after a cup of coffee is better than waiting until they feel the urge. Rushing around all day ignoring the mild signals you get from your body is not conducive to normal bowel function!

                          Medications:
                          Stool softeners (like Colace®) and mild laxatives like Milk of Magnesia (we call it M.O.M. in the hospital!) are safe to use during pregnancy. M.O.M. can also be used for heartburn. It is always best to avoid stimulant laxatives (like Dulcolax®, Ex-lax® and Correctol®) unless directed by your practitioner. If you are not sure about a laxative's safety, be sure to ask your practitioner.

                           

                           


                          0 0

                          Abdominal achiness or pain is among the most common pregnancy symptoms. It is not uncommon to feel sharp pains on the sides of the abdomen with the growth of the fetus.

                          Causes of Abdominal Achiness and Pains

                          One cause for abdominal achiness and pains is due to the stretching of your round ligaments, which are located on both sides of the abdomen and run from the top of the abdromen to the groin area, which occurs during pregnancy. As the embryo grows within the uterus, the stomach get larger and larger and the thick bands of connective tissue stretch in order to accommodate the new size. It is this stretching of the ligaments that often causes some aches and pains.

                          Another cause for abdominal achiness and pains may be due to the increased blood flow that is now necessary in order to support your growing baby.

                          Yet another cause may be due to the fact that throughout your pregnancy there is a build-up of your endometrium in your uterus. While your endometrium shed during menstration, now that you are prengnat and no longer menstrating you are no longer shedding your endometrium.

                          Important Facts about Abdominal Achiness and Pains

                          Sudden changes in body position are enough to trigger round ligament/abdominal pain. Getting up quickly, lying down, or even a sharp cough can cause new stretching of the ligaments that can be painful. These pains often last only a few brief moments, but it is not uncommon for the soreness to linger for a few hours. If the pains are associated with spotting, cramping, change in body temperature or fever, it is important to seek out medical attention.

                          Treatment for Round Ligament Pain

                          Abdominal achiness is something that comes with pregnancy, but that does not mean you have to sit around in pain for its duration. Sitting down with your feet propped up is one of the best solutions of round ligament/abdominal achiness and pain. If resting does not relieve the pain or the achiness turnes into sharper pain, contact your attending physician for more advice.


                          0 0

                           Achy Abdomen

                          During pregnancy, the ligaments located on the left and right side of the abdomen may create some abdominal discomfort from time to time. It is not uncommon to feel sharp pains on the sides of the tummy as well with the growth of the fetus.

                          Causes of Round Ligament Pain
                          Ligaments are located on the sides of the abdomen. These run from the top of the tummy to the groin area. As baby grows, the tummy gets larger and larger and the thick bands of connective tissue must stretch in order to accommodate the new size. As the ligaments stretch, some aches and pains are often felt by pregnant women. Increased blood flow to the area may also cause some pain which is also common.

                          [bmed_ad_r]Important Facts about Abdominal Achiness
                          Sudden changes in body position are enough to trigger round ligament pain. Getting up quickly, lying down or even a sharp cough can cause new stretching of the ligaments that can be painful. These pains often last only a few brief moments, but it is not uncommon for the soreness to linger for a few hours. If the pains are associated with spotting, cramping, change in body temperature or fever, it is important to seek out medical attention regarding the pain.

                          Treatment for Round Ligament Pain
                          Abdominal achiness is something that comes along with pregnancy, but that does not mean mom has to sit around in pain for the duration. Sitting down with feet propped up is one of the best solutions. If resting does not relieve the pain or the achiness turns into a sharper pain, contact your attending physician for more advice.


                          0 0

                          Pregnancy is a beautiful, life-altering experience, but it can also be painful. The female body is used to the normal monthly cycle and average hormone levels most of the time. When pregnancy occurs, hormones like estrogen and progesterone flood the body, weight gain occurs and the abdomen stretches larger than most women can even comprehend. The pain associated with these changes can often be scary and confusing.

                          Lower Body Pains During Pregnancy

                          • Lower Back Pain: The abdomen is growing out and down and back muscles are not equipped for the added weight. This additional pressure can lead to back aches and pains during pregnancy. Progesterone may also be partly to blame. Progesterone works to loosen ligaments for birth, but it cannot dedicate that work to the pelvic region only. Loose back ligaments can lead to hyper-extension of the back and back pains during pregnancy.
                          • Hip and Pelvis Pain: Progesterone is to blame for these pains as well. The same ligament loosening process that allows baby to move through the birth canal will loosen connective tissues in the pelvis and hips causing pains during pregnancy.

                          Upper Body Pains During Pregnancy

                          • Abdominal Pain: As the fetus grows the uterus will expand and so will abdominal muscles and skin. Stretching skin and lengthening (and thickening) ligaments can easily cause pains during pregnancy.
                          • Sciatic Pain: The sciatic nerve is the longest in the human body running from the neck area down through the midsection and down the leg. Pains during pregnancy associated with the sciatic nerve are often associated with increased pressure on the portion of the nerve located in the buttocks. Sitting for long periods of time may increase the risk of sciatic pains during pregnancy.
                          • Shoulder and Neck Pain: Back to progesterone, the ligaments in the shoulders and neck are loosened during pregnancy. Combine this looseness with the weight of the abdomen and already taxed back muscles and posture may be affected. Something as simple as a small change in posture can cause shoulder and neck pains during pregnancy.

                          Limb and Head Pains During Pregnancy

                          • Wrist and Arm Pain: Often referred to as carpal tunnel syndrome, swelling of the hands and wrists may cause pains during pregnancy. The carpal tunnel is a small hole in the wrist through which nerves pass. When pregnancy swelling occurs, these nerves can be pinched causing fingers to tingle, go numb or hurt. Wrist braces can be used to prevent swelling induced wrist and arm pains during pregnancy.
                          • Headaches and Migraines: Good old hormones are often responsible for headaches and migraines. Some women who suffer from migraines before pregnancy find symptoms are worse while pregnant while others seem to find relief from migraine pains during pregnancy. Each female body will react differently to hormone changes.

                          Here's a list of Safe Medications to Take During Pregnancy.


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                          Crohn’s Disease is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder. Typically, the body can tell the difference between native and foreign substances, but patients with Crohn’s Disease lack this ability. Their bodies are constantly on high immune alert causing constant inflammation, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract. Patients are often diagnosed with one of four types of Crohn’s Disease depending on the portion of the gastrointestinal tract affected. The disease can affect the rectum, small intestine, large intestine or colon.

                          ColonWho is at Risk?
                          Anyone with a family history of Crohn’s Disease or of Jewish decent are at increased risk for the condition. Smoking also increases the risk of contracting Crohn’s Disease.

                          Symptoms

                          Crohn’s Disease symptoms tend to present when the condition flares. The specific symptoms depend upon the area of the gastrointestinal tract most affected by the disease. Common symptoms include:

                          • Abdominal cramping
                          • Loss of energy
                          • No appetite
                          • Painful bowel movements
                          • Diarrhea
                          • Weight loss

                          Other symptoms that appear less often include constipation, pain in joints, inflammation of the liver, bloody stool and sores on the skin.

                          Complications

                          Due to a thickening of the intestinal tract, patients may experience intestinal blockage or bowel obstructions. Growth may be slower than average and nutritional deficiency may occur. Children may show signs of sexual developmental delays.

                          Diagnosis

                          [bmed_ad_r]Patients presenting with symptoms of Crohn’s Disease will often undergo a detailed medical history and physical tests, before being scheduled for other diagnostic procedures. Palpation of the abdomen often reveals masses in the stomach that may hurt to touch. Joints may appear swollen and a skin rash may be present in some cases.
                          After physical testing is complete, doctors may suggest colonoscopy, upper GI, enteroscopy, endoscopy and CT scan to make a final diagnosis. A stool culture may be collected for testing.

                          Crohn's Disease During Pregnancy

                          The prognosis of Crohn's disease during pregnancy depends on the severity and exptent of the disease when she becomes pregnant and the medications she takes. If she is in remission at that time than two-thirds of women will stay in remission. Women who have active Crohn's at the time of onset of pregnancy are more likely to remain active during pregnancy. There is no complete agreement of the effects of pregnancy on Crohn's disease or the effect of Crohn's on pregnancy. The more severe the extent of the disease at the beginning of pregnancy, the more severe it will be during pregnancy, and there will be an increasec risk of premature birth and low birthweight babies.  

                          Treatment
                          There is no definitive cause or cure for Crohn’s Disease. Patients must alter diet to reduce symptoms. Specific foods are not prohibited, but each patient will likely discover trigger foods that cause symptoms to flare up. Patients should eat a well-balanced diet broken into small meals eaten five to six times a day. Water intake should also be broken into small amounts. High-fiber, high-fat and fried foods should be avoided. Foods that commonly cause gas like beans and cabbage should also be avoided.

                          Medical treatment for the disease may include medications to reduce stress, fiber supplements and over the counter pain medications. Corticosteroids and anti-immune drugs may be prescribed in moderate to severe cases.

                          If the condition does not improve with other forms of treatment, patients may have bowel resection to remove the diseased portion of the gastrointestinal system. Bowel resection may relieve symptoms temporarily, but it does not cure Crohn’s Disease.

                          Life Expectancy
                          While the symptoms of Crohn’s Disease may be controlled with medications and altered diet and nutrition, patients are at increased risk for colon and bowel cancer. With effective treatment, patients can live a normal life-span, but complications may increase the risk of early death.


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